HatchFit Body,Diet,Fitness,Nutrition Episode 413 – Q&A with Robb and Nicki #12

Episode 413 – Q&A with Robb and Nicki #12



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Here we are with Q&A #12 with Robb and Nicki for Episode 413 of The Paleo Solution Podcast!

Don’t forget to send in your own podcast question to use here: https://robbwolf.com/contact/submit-a-question-for-the-podcast/

Show Notes:

1. [1:36] Keto for children

Kaleigh says:

Hey Robb! I’ve read a few studies and heard people talking about Keto diets helping children with epilepsy and behavioral disorders. But I’m wondering if it’s healthy for all children? I want to raise my child healthy and I don’t feel comfortable feeding him processed foods, sugar, and grains like baby cereals and junk foods. How do I know if I’m feeding him the right amount of fats, protein and carbs?

I love your podcast and would love to hear your thoughts on this!

2. [9:27] Am I ‘carb adapted’

Dan says:

I have recently finished reading Wired to Eat and shortly after began testing many of the foods on the list. The majority (outside of oatmeal at 123 mg) have come back surprisingly low at <100 mg. I have even went as far to test sour dough bread and cinnamon toast crunch just to see the effect which also came in <100. About 6 months ago I sent some blood off to test what ‘my ideal macros’ should be and it came back 40/40/20 c/p/f which I automatically thought was a farce given this sort or split is classic ‘bodybuilder’ macro split amd seemed gimmicky. However post testing my own blood myself, I am starting to think maybe it was accurate. I am 35 and have always been a bit carbaphobic – so my question to you is 1) is it possible, or have you seen this sort of reaction with others who are able to eat carbs without a spike in blood sugar? 2) what does this tell us (good, bad, indifferent) and 3) I would really like to experiment with a keto reset for 2-3 months/year given I feel there are great longevity aspects – however if my body handles carbs well – would you suggest a high fat/keto protocol for benefits?

Thanks for all that you out out there.

Dan

3. [14:17] nicotine affect on ketosis levels

Pierce says:

So i’ve been on the “keto” diet for almost 3 months now, my carb intake is between 15 and 20 grams of carbs per day with around 1500-1700 calories overall and im consuming around 130-150g of protein a day. My daily blood ketone level is between a .4 and .7

I CHEW almost religiously, could there be an affect on my blood ketone level with the nicotine from my chewing, or even enough to keep me at such a low level of ketosis?

4. [17:00] Lifting vs Jiu-Jitsu

Stu says:

Hi Robb!

After many years of “Bro-Splits” and curls I finally got into heavy compound lifting about a year ago and have run 5×5 type beginner programs and recently more intermediate templates as well. I really enjoy lifting and currently hit the squats, deads and Bench 3X a week (cardio 1 or 2 days in between)

I really want to start Jiu Jitsu though. I’ve been interested in it for the longest time, and I finally need to just get my ass on the mat and do it. Is once a week “enough” for Jiu Jitsu? I have a feeling I’ll get into it and want to do more, but I also don’t really want to slow down on the lifting and there’s only so many hrs in the day (Running a family business during the day and trying to get a little health coaching biz going at night! www.supersimian.co.za for people in South Africa Yes! One of your 6 fans is in South Africa ).

What would you recommend for someone wanting to get started?

5. [21:26] Low Appetite on Paleo

Jai (female) says:

Hi Robb & Nicki!

I have a question regarding having a naturally low appetite. Growing up, I remember having a pretty inconsistent appetite compared to my peers and family. I was a competitive athlete up through sophmore year of college and I felt like that really drove my appetite. For most of my life, I had a low (but normal) BMI, which slowly crept to an overweight BMI in the last few years. I developed some poor eating habits in my 20’s and struggled with depression which led to a 30 lb weight gain. I’ve dabbled in Paleo for a long time, but about 2 months ago I really dove in after reading Wired to Eat and experiencing some scary health symptoms (fatigue, orthostasis, parathesias in my legs and fingers, blurry vision). Since eliminating grains, dairy and soy, I have noticed that I am rarely hungry. I counted calories/macros for a few days to see where I am at and I hover around 1600 calories (food detailed below if you need it). I am 5’5″, 150 (after a 15lb weight loss!) and moderately sedentary. I’m a nursing student, so I move around a lot at clincals, but spend much of the day sitting to study. I rock climb 2-3 days a week, and walk 2-3 days also. I plan to add 1-2 days of lifting as well. My concern is that I may be undernourishing myself. Is this something I should worry about? Is it possible for some people to just need fewer calories? Is this something I shouldn’t worry about until I get to a lower weight? I don’t feel like I am underreating. I have a lot of energy. My skin looks great. I’ve put on more muscle. Depression has disappeared and anxiety is back to a manageable level. IBS is much improved also. I have sphincter of oddi dysfunction too, which gets a little frisky when I have too much fat, but it’s drastically improved since cutting out dairy.

Thank you so much for the work that you do! I have had amazing results and the workbook for Wired to Eat really kept me motivated. I’ve already roped 3 friends into reading the book and trying the lifestyle mods. One of the biggest changes I have made is socializing more, and I don’t know that I would have ever done that without your book. I’m much happier and healthier. Thank you!

Breakfast: usually 2 eggs, handful of berries, and some sliced carrots, if I am hungry enough (skip breakfast 2-3 days per week bc I am not hungry until later in the day)

(sometimes) Snack: epic bar and baby food pouch (pureed fruit & veggies)

Lunch: Chicken or fish with another handful of berries or maybe some melon. & a veggie, like asparagus or greens

Dinner: some type of red meat and 1/4-1/2 sweet potato.

Primarily focus on getting protein in because it’s easiest for me to digest.

6. [28:20] Mechanism behind foods that lower blood glucose

The Great Dane says:

Hey Robb and Nicki,

People talk and write about foods (or supplements) that help lower blood glucose. As i understand it, some of it has to do with the activation of glut-4 transporters (e.g. When taking Alpha lipoic acid). This should make your muskels more insuline sensitive and thereby lower blood glucose (might not be exactly what happens). But what about stuff like cinnamon, vinegar and lemon juice? Is it the same mechanisms or is it sinply because they tell the pancreas to produce insuline. After hearing Peter Attia on The Tim Ferriss show several years ago, one of my goals have been to keep insulin low. I want to use as many hacks as i can to keep blood glucose low, but i don’t want it to be low because of insuline secretion. Is there anything to this? Or am i good to go with the hacks?

Squatchy’s note on cinnamon:

There are mainly two types of cinnamon you can typically find to purchase, Ceylon (“true cinnamon”) cinnamon, and Cassia cinnamon. The Cassia cinnamon is by far the most common, and what you usually find as the cheap cinnamon in most grocery stores. Ceylon cinnamon is usually a bit more expensive and can be found in some grocery stores (especially more natural health food type stores) and online. Robb mentioned high cinnamon consumption being dangerous for your liver. Coumarin is a naturally occuring compound in cinnamon and some other plants. Coumarin is a blood thinner, and consuming large amounts of coumarin can be harmful to your liver. The cheaper Cassia cinnamon contains a lot more coumarin than the Ceylon cinnamon. Cassia is about 1% coumarin, and Ceylon is about 0.004%, so a pretty big difference. I would recommend Ceylon cinnamon because of the much lower coumarin content, and it has a better flavor and is sweeter tasting. If the cinnamon you buy is not labeled as Ceylon cinnamon, then it’s almost guaranteed to be Cassia cinnamon.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3385612/

 

 

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Transcript:

Download a copy of this transcript here (PDF).

Paleo Solution – 413

[0:00:47]

Robb: Alrightey, folks! We are back in another edition of Paleo Solution Podcast. I took away Nicki’s pen. She will not be clicking that during today’s episode. I do have to do a little mousing, but I will try to not be too augural on that.

Nicki: And I’m not even in a chair that moves because otherwise, there are the squeaky sounds that come from that, so I’m going to try to be quiet.

Robb: You’re kind of noisy during these things. Do you have anything you want to report, share?

Nicki: My goodness. We had frost this morning.

Robb: We did, we did.

Nicki: So I’m happy that we’re now in the end of fall —

Robb: Winter is coming.

Nicki: Winter is coming, yeah. I believe we’ll get the season finale of that here in the next eight months.

Robb: Something like that.

Nicki: The winter that’s coming that never comes, the finale.

Robb: Yeah. Okay. Do you want to jump in here?

Nicki: All right, sounds good. Let’s see. Our first question is from Kaylie on the topic of keto for children. “Hey, Robb! I’ve read a few studies and heard people talking about keto diets helping children with epilepsy and behavioral disorders, but I’m wondering if it’s healthy for all children. I want to raise my child healthy and I don’t feel comfortable feeding him processed foods, sugar, and grains like baby cereals and junk foods. How do I know if I’m feeding him the right amount of fats, proteins, and carbs? I love your podcast and I’d love to hear your thoughts.”

Robb: I know a few folks — I’m thinking a lot of stuff here. There are definitely medical conditions that seem to lend themselves to a low carb diet for kids, type one diabetes being one of them, although…

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